Can Fans Handle More Fantasy? Teams Should Find Out

Nobody can debate the power of fantasy sports and the value of the marketplace, currently dominated by football. Following typical economics, as customers showed their appetite for more fantasy, competitors have flooded the market with countless products, each claiming a different fantasy experience, or unique prizes. In the end, most of the products are similar and ESPN and Yahoo continue to dominate because of their established brand and unmatched scale.

However, one area I’m surprised content producers have not yet fully exploited is team-based fantasy games or contests linked to in-venue or in-game viewing. Football aside, other major sports have room for growth. In fact, basketball and baseball participation remains flat or down the past few years, so each could use some innovation to invigorate it. Further, the local nature of these sports lends themselves more to team-based games involving their home team and maybe specific opponents or rivals.

The concept aligns with the current movement for teams to nurture a community. Nothing stimulates engagement more than fantasy, so if teams can steer that engagement to their own websites, broadcasts, and live games, it could lead to indirect benefits in key revenue streams, in addition to creating a new branding platform. Further, teams control the assets (players), the arena, at least have a significant say in television, and have a complementary web presence. With this combination of assets teams could activate fantasy in a compelling manner through multiple distribution channels and have real, coveted prizes (locker room visits, luxury suite, road trip) with access that other fantasy outlets can’t offer.

Thus far, most teams and leagues have taken a backseat, allowing media and retail operations to claim much of the value they create. It’s time for teams to become more progressive, be willing to step out and be innovative. We can think of any number of ways to implement the game, that’s not the hard part. Making the decision to do it, marketing it the right way, and executing well are the keys.

Conversely, if teams don’t act soon, media outlets with focus shifting toward local will jump on it. ESPN <Fill in the City> already possesses the know-how and operations to extend fantasy to city and team levels. CBS can leverage its local radio stations to do so as well. It’s only a matter of time for RSNs finally to move on this opportunity they have sat on for years, especially with the ESPN putting the competitive pressure on.

Maybe the fantasy market truly is saturated, and fans simply can’t handle more. But, if I’m running team marketing or business operations, I’d rather find that out rather than let someone else cash in on my assets once again. A few small shops have started to poke around with Facebook apps (Watercooler), and a rogue game or two has emerged here or there, but when the teams or major media entities make the move, then it becomes serious.

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